Invoicing and getting paid has never been easier!

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CEO of Revo Payments, Mike Corbera, has been invited to speak at NACHA’s Payments 2013 Conference, which is held at the San Diego Convention Center on April 23rd. Corbera will be presenting at the newest addition to the annual NACHA Payments Conference, Payments 3D, discussing the value of vertically-focused payment hubs for banks; particularly as a defensive measure to third-party payment services. Previously, Corbera spoke at NACHA at Payments 2011 on the subjects of Bank Payments Hubs and Social Media Payments. This year, Corbera will particularly demonstrate Electronic Bill Presentment and eInvoicing as private-label bank services. Corbera will inform his audience that with industry-focused payment software, banks will preserve and defend their existing commercial payment relationships.  

This year, NACHA has introduced the Payments 3D forum as a platform to showcase innovative and disruptive companies that are changing the payments landscape. As a showcase company, Revo will present an interactive demonstration and exhibit at the Payments 3D Pavilion.

The annual NACHA Payments Conference allows its attendees the opportunity to gain awareness of the next generation in the payments industry. Through interactive demonstrations followed by in-person exhibits of the new consumer and small business payment solution providers, a consideration for strategic long-term partnerships or competitive solutions are made available for businesses and organizations attending. Revo Payments looks forward to having CEO Mike Corbera present at the upcoming 3D Payments sector of the NACHA Payments 2013 Conference, while also meeting and establishing relationships with existing, new, and future clients and partners. 

About Revo Payments
Revo Payments builds industry-focused commercial
ePayments software.  Our secure, hosted software offers vertical modules for: Property Management, Schools, Non-Profits, Utilities, and B2B clients, and is sold primarily through community banks and enterprise partners.  The Revo Payment Dashboard integrates with third-party software and incorporates all payment types (credit cards, eChecks, recurring ACH, PayPal, and lockbox); all payment channels (mobile, web, voice, and in-person); and all payment services (Online Payments, eInvoicing, eVendor Payments, and remote deposit capture).  The company has been in business since 2003, with offices in Venice, CA and Miami, FL.  Our vision is to convert all paper-based commercial transactions to digital payments through bank software that supports unique industry needs.  Learn more at www.revopayments.com www.paagoinvoice and www.revopropertypay.com

For More Information:

REVO PAYMENTS

Jose Corbera

VP of Business Development

786-391-1124

305-252-8297 x114

E-mail: jcorbera@revopayments.com

www.revopayments.com

www.paagoinvoice.com

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April 2, 2013—Revo Payments started off the month of March by attending the Biz to Biz Expo event to present Paago Invoice at the Fort Lauderdale Broward Convention Center in Fort Lauderdale, FL on March 3rd. Executive of Revo Payments, Joe Corbera, conducted a six-foot exhibition table at the event, to inform the fellow attendees of the Paago Invoice product of business to business e-invoicing and payments. This gave Joe Corbera the chance to share with potential clients and partners Paago’s speciality features of free online invoicing, electronic payment processing, accurate real-time reporting, integration with local accounting software, integration with Google Apps, easy customer management, and custom development to meet a company’s needs.

 

With a headcount of approximately one thousand attendees at the event, this was a great opportunity to visually display Paago’s free electronic invoicing service, the only eInvoice service integrated with Facebook and Paypal. Corbera was successfully able to reach out to prospective customers and businesses of all ranges, as Paago allows for easy integration and supports all payment methods (credit cards, eChecks, recurring Ach, Paypal, and Facebook Credits), all payment channels (mobile, web, voice, and in-person), and all payment types (Online Payments, eInvoicing, and eVendor Payments). Overall, Paago Invoice had a successful exposition experience at the Biz to Biz Expo held at the Fort Lauderdale Broward Convention Center, and looks forward to more events in the future.

   

About Paago Invoice:

Paago Invoice is a division of Revo Payments that allows users to perform B2B e-invoicing and payments. Paago offers free electronic invoicing service; and is the only eInvoice service that is integrated with Facebook and PayPal. The service is targeted towards paper intensive, small to medium sized businesses who seek an easier and more effective method of billing and receiving payment from customers. Online invoicing allows for quick, paperless transactions and a significantly increased cash flow. Paago supports all payment methods (credit cards, eChecks, recurring ACH, PayPal, and Facebook Credits), all payment channels (mobile, web, voice, and in-person), and all payment types (Online Payments, eInvoicing, and eVendor Payments). In addition to the electronic invoicing service, Paago also maintains all records electronically and allows for easy integration with a company’s accounting software. The service is 100% secure and PCI compliant. Paago’s parent company, Revo Payments, has been in business since 2003 and has offices in both Venice, CA, and Miami, FL. Learn more at www.paagoinvoice.com

 

For More Information:

REVO PAYMENTS

Jose Corbera

VP of Business Development

786-391-1124

305-252-8297 x114

E-mail: jcorbera@revopayments.com

www.revopayments.com  

www.paagoinvoice.com  

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Revo Payments will be in attendance at the Independent Community Bankers of America (ICBA) National Convention, which takes place on March 11th-15th, 2013 at the Wynn Hotel in Las Vegas, NV. Revo Payments will meet and network with existing and prospective clients and partners also in attendance at this premiere annual convention for community bankers.  Revo’s bank-branded software platform enables banks to offer feature- rich industry-focused electronic invoicing and payment solutions to their customers. The software extends simple lockbox service, into a much broader, integrated payments hub to enable epayments in key industries like: property management, schools, non-profits, utilities, and b2b invoicing.  Amy Oswick, the Financial Institution Leader to Revo Payments, will be onsite providing private demonstrations of Revo Payments’ ePayment software  as a bank service on the first day of the event, March 11th. The affordable subscription-based pricing of Revo Payments’ bank software platform eliminates large up-front licensing and deployment fees, and thus banks of any size can offer Revo’s software to assist them in attracting and retaining customers.  

If you are also attending the ICBA National Convention, are interested in meeting with Amy Oswick in regards to a private demonstration, or have any further questions, please reach out to Amy Oswick directly via e-mail at aoswick@revopayments.com or by phone at (310)593-4833 x110. Revo Payments looks forward to meeting and establishing relationships with existing, new, and future clients and partners at the upcoming ICBA National Convention.

About Revo Payments
Revo Payments builds industry-focused commercial
ePayments software.  Our secure, hosted software offers vertical modules for: Property Management, Schools, Non-Profits, Utilities, and B2B clients, and is sold primarily through community banks and enterprise partners.  The Revo Payment Dashboard integrates with third-party software and incorporates all payment types (credit cards, eChecks, recurring ACH, PayPal, and lockbox); all payment channels (mobile, web, voice, and in-person); and all payment services (Online Payments, eInvoicing, eVendor Payments, and remote deposit capture).  The company has been in business since 2003, with offices in Venice, CA and Miami, FL.  Our vision is to convert all paper-based commercial transactions to digital payments through bank software that supports unique industry needs.  Learn more at www.revopayments.com www.paagoinvoice and www.revopropertypay.com

For More Information:

REVO PAYMENTS

Jose Corbera

VP of Business Development

786-391-1124

305-252-8297 x114

E-mail: jcorbera@revopayments.com

www.revopayments.com

www.paagoinvoice.com

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January 22, 2013 marked the 4th annual Latino Business Awards luncheon, where the Los Angeles Business Journal along with Community Partner the Latin Business Association acknowledged Revo Payments as a finalist. Mike Corbera, CEO and Chairman of Revo Payments, an industry focused epayment software as a bank service, attended the event to accept the company’s award as a finalist among all Latino businesses in Los Angeles. The nomination process solely considered companies that are 50% Latino owned or operated in the Los Angeles County. Corbera, who is a first generation Cuban-American, was raised in Miami and has been living in LA for nearly a decade, starting Revo Payments in Santa Monica in 2003. The awards event, held at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel in downtown Los Angeles, aimed to commemorate the impact of Latino business involvement and success to the entirety of the Los Angeles business community. Ranging anywhere from emerging businesses, established businesses, or non-profit organizations, these annual Latino Business Awards reveal the Latino business community’s wide range of contribution. Revo Payments was honored in being named a finalist for the 2013 Latino Business Awards, gaining recognition for the successful ten years of business as a financial technology and software company.

 

About Revo Payments
Revo Payments builds industry-focused commercial
ePayments software.  Our secure, hosted software offers vertical modules for: Property Management, Schools, Non-Profits, Utilities, and B2B clients, and is sold primarily through community banks and enterprise partners.  The Revo Payment Dashboard integrates with third-party software and incorporates all payment types (credit cards, eChecks, recurring ACH, PayPal, and lockbox); all payment channels (mobile, web, voice, and in-person); and all payment services (Online Payments, eInvoicing, eVendor Payments, and remote deposit capture).  The company has been in business since 2003, with offices in Venice, CA and Miami, FL.  Our vision is to convert all paper-based commercial transactions to digital payments through bank software that supports unique industry needs.  Learn more at www.revopayments.com www.paagoinvoice and www.revopropertypay.com

 

 

 

For More Information:

 

REVO PAYMENTS

Jose Corbera

VP of Business Development

786-391-1124

305-252-8297 x114

E-mail: jcorbera@revopayments.com

www.revopayments.com

www.paagoinvoice.com

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A good sales manager will do her best to keep her team pumped up and selling happily. But even the best sales manager can’t be psyching you up every hour of every day. Top-tier salespeople take responsibility for their own lives, and know how to keep selling even when everything seems to be going wrong. You too can motivate yourself with the following tricks.

Set Specific Goals

Yes, you almost certainly have quotas handed down from upper management. But are you really going to let someone else decide what you’re capable of? Look at your own past performance, think about how much money you want to take home in your next commission check, and set yourself a specific goal that’s customized to YOU.

Track Activities

Your sales totals may be dismal this week, but if you can look back and remind yourself that you made 300 cold calls, you’ll feel better about the fact that you are indeed putting in the effort and will soon be rewarded by success. Of course, if you look back at your records and discover that you made five cold calls all week, that will give you an inkling of why you’re not succeeding and how to fix it.

Choose Mini-Goals

Deciding that you’ll aim for 500 sales this quarter is good. But it doesn’t give you a lot to aim for in the short term. You should also set smaller and more quickly achievable goals, so that you can get that thrill of accomplishment as you work your way towards your ultimate goal. This could be as simple as dividing your main goal into smaller components – say, aiming for 40 sales a week so that you can be sure to hit your eventual target. You can also set activity-related goals, like sending out 20 thank-you notes every Thursday.

Promise Yourself a Reward

Decide in advance how you’ll reward yourself when you hit one of your mini – or major – goals. Dinner at that fancy restaurant you love? An afternoon on the golf course? A trip to the ballpark with your whole family? A quiet drive out to the beach all by yourself? Pick something that you really want or know you’ll enjoy, and reaching your goals will be all the sweeter.

Don’t Procrastinate

Putting off the unpleasant parts of your job will only make them worse. If there’s a task you’re really dreading, get it done first thing in the morning. Not only will you feel much better once it’s done, but you also won’t have it hanging over your head all day. Plus, once you’ve polished off a difficult job everything else will seem easier by comparison. Just say to yourself, “If I could get through telling Mr. Jones that the parts he desperately needs were lost in transit, then these cold calls will be a piece of cake.”

Remember Your Triumphs

Whenever you do something remarkable, be it closing five sales in one day or talking your competitor’s biggest customer into buying from you instead, write down a summary of your success and stick it up on the wall or the side of your computer monitor. When you’re feeling down, look over the list of your past successes and remind yourself that the next big success is just around the corner.

Break Big Jobs into Small Pieces

Sitting down with a brand-new lead list that’s 50 pages long can be pretty daunting. So instead of thinking, “I have to call 600 strangers now,” approach the job in pieces. Maybe you do some quick research on the first ten names, then call them, and then switch to an unrelated task for a few minutes. By changing tasks on a regular basis throughout the day, you’ll stay fresh and will have a lot more energy to apply to each one.
- Wendy Connick

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Not every business is always doing something newsworthy, but just about every business wants to be in the news. This is why so many of the dozens of press releases we get every day are less-than gripping.

But there are exceptions and today our sister publication, the Boston Business Journal, shared this headline: "Dyn: Mayan apocalypse doesn’t have to destroy your website” and then offered a story based entirely on a genius, yet “facetious” press release.

An excerpt of the release:

With the Mayan calendar predicting the end of the world this Friday, the worldwide Internet infrastructure as a service leaders at Dyn are urging anyone with a website to walk, not run, to their nearest managed DNS provider to make sure they have Active Failover so it will survive the impending destruction.

“We might not be able to save you, but we can save your website,” said chief revenue officer Kyle York. “When the world ends, don’t you want to leave behind a legacy?”

Launched in 2001, it’s been a hell of a year for the infrastructure-as-service company. In October the Manchester, New Hampshire-based Dyn announced it raised it’s first outside investment, a $38 million round led by North Bridge Venture Partners, and recruited Jason Calacanis, founder of Weblogs—acquired by AOL—and a well-known angel investor, to sit on its board.

Based on this press release, it looks like the company is really hitting its stride, and having fun doing so.

- Michael del Castillo

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While profits are great, you can’t pay your bills or employees with net income – no matter how big your accountants may tell you that it is. You can only pay bills with cash. An important piece of advice almost all business owners hear is: Whatever you do, don’t run out of cash. This sounds so reasonable, but what does it really mean, and what can you do to make sure your cash flow is healthy?

As a first step, let’s define cash flow: Cash flow is the net measure of cash coming into and going out of your business. If your cash flow is positive, then you are taking in more cash for a given period that you are spending. Negative cash flow means that the company has spent more in a given period than it has taken in.

Sources of cash for a typical business include cash from sales of your product or services for the period. An alternative source would be collections in the period for sales made in a previous period. Other possible sources are income from investments or other cash infusions into the business (debt or equity).

Where most businesses spend their cash: purchases of raw materials, tools and parts (if you are manufacturing or assembling a product); wages, rent and other operating expenses (payroll expenses, supplies, advertising, professional services, telephone, utilities, for example); interest expense; loan repayments and any other expenses incurred and paid by the business for the period. Capital expenditures (generally, expenditures for long-term assets) are another possible area of spending.

How can you improve cash flow? Here are a few simple rules:

Increase sales: Obviously, sales growth (and associated collections) will solve all kinds of problems. This is more of a sales and marketing issue than a cash issue, per se, but should be a primary focus for management.

Collect cash more rapidly: Focus resources on the rapid collection of those outstanding invoices that you have issued. As interest rates increase (which they inevitably will, and therefore the opportunity cost of delayed collections) this becomes an ever more pressing issue.

Delay cash payments as long as possible (slower payment of accounts payable) without breaching integrity: I have seen certain large corporations raise this almost to the level of an art form (and if the company’s accounts payable is in the billions, it deserves that level of focus). I am not proposing that you violate any written or verbal agreements or understandings, but even if your company is flush with cash, paying according to the terms of your vendor agreements is completely acceptable.

Here are a few ideas to help you maximize the amount of cash in house at any time:

  • Ask customers to pay sooner by changing your credit period.
  • Offer discounts to customers who pay early.
  • Require credit checks on all new noncash customers, and do not sell to those with unacceptable ratings.
  • Issue invoices promptly and, if payments are slow in coming, follow up immediately.
  • Ask customers to make deposit payments at the time orders are taken.
  • Make sure invoices are accurate and easy to understand.
  • Track accounts receivable to identify and avoid slow-paying customers.
  • Understand your customers’ payment cycle, and time your invoices to coincide.
  • Institute a policy of cash on delivery (COD) as an alternative with slow-paying customers.
  • Take full advantage of creditor payment terms or ask for extended terms. If a payment is due in 30 days, do not pay it in 15 days.
  • Use electronic funds transfer to make payments on the last day they are due. You will remain current with suppliers while retaining use of your funds as long as possible.
  • Communicate with your suppliers so they know your financial situation. If you ever need to delay a payment, you will need their trust and understanding.
  • Carefully consider vendors’ offers of discounts for earlier payments. These can amount to expensive loans to your suppliers, or they may provide you with a chance to reduce overall costs.
  • Do not always focus on the lowest price when choosing suppliers. Sometimes more flexible payment terms can improve your cash flow more than a low price.

It may seem self-evident, but effectively managing your company’s cash flow brings excellent returns to the owners and management, and helps management to run the company more effectively and efficiently. By implementing these guidelines, management will be well on its way to maximizing the amount of cash on hand.

- Bruce Rector

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I might have a new job working at the Samsonite outlet mall store. Let me explain why.

I recently bought a multimedia projector so I could show short video clips from my laptop when I am conducting a seminar. I am tired of relying on people who tell me “Oh, I’m sorry I did not have a projector for you” when I show up to the place I am speaking.

I was looking for something very specific that not only would carry what I already have in my briefcase, but could fit under the seat in front of me on the airplane. I went to a number of office supply stores, and I could not find what I wanted.

I was going past one of those outlet malls, and I thought what the heck, I’ll give it a shot. I noticed a Samsonite store and went in with my briefcase in tow. I asked the clerk whether I could load up my “stuff” in his display model to see whether at all would fit.

He replied, “Everybody else does, so please take your time.”

He noticed as I pulled out a couple of my books (I always have a few with me just in case!) that it was a sales book.

“Hey, I’ve heard of that book,” he said.

I told him that I knew the author, and he quickly connected the dots and realized (because there is a picture on the back of the book) it was me. He started to ask some really great questions about selling, sales training, being on the road, etc.

I was impressed with his curiosity, and then I started to ask him some questions about his sales training.

His answer was pretty typical: quite a bit of training on the product, but not as much on the actual selling skills.

I have said this time and time again: This gets salespeople to “dump” information and not properly qualify the customer. He was great at talking about the product, but he needed help keeping the customer engaged through questions.

While I was checking out my future briefcase, which I had not bought yet, I noticed a couple of customers come into the store and look around with very little interaction with the salesperson.

He asked the obligatory question, “Is there anything I can help you with?” The response was “Just looking.”

About seven or eight minutes later, I noticed that one of the women that was previously in the store had returned.

The salesperson and I were chatting about how to handle objections properly (Geez, OK, I love what I do for a living), and I said “Would you mind if I take this customer for 30 seconds?”

He said go for it!

I approached the women, who was looking at a cover for her iPad, and I said to her: “I see that you are looking for an iPad cover. What are you specifically looking for the cover to do for you?”

She said that she wanted to protect it from getting bumped or dinged while she had it in her purse.

I asked whether she had looked anywhere else. She said she had been looking for a while but did not find what she wanted.

I then said, “Tell me your wish list.”

She wanted a simple sleeve that has a front pocket. While I was playing with my “future” briefcase, I had noticed a number of iPad covers on a rack 2 feet from me.

“I think that I have the perfect cover for you, and it will do exactly what you want and at a very competitive price,” I said. “I am sure that you might find something for a dollar cheaper somewhere else, but we have a fantastic return policy if you don’t like it or it does not work for you.”

She said, “I will take it,” and then I pointed to the real salesperson and said he would ring her up.

A few simple questions to her kept her there, and I was able to find out what she wanted.

I have to go now and finish filling out my application for the sales position at the Samsonite store. I think I have a good shot at the job.

- Hal Becker

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Q: Are there any techniques that could help me brainstorm? — Kai Prout

A: When I took part in attempts to set speed records for hot air ballooning across the oceans in the ’80s and ’90s, we got into some sticky situations. For me, the term “brainstorm” always brings back memories of flying a hot air balloon 30,000 feet above the earth into the eye of a very different kind of storm. In those terrifying, exhilarating moments, our team desperately racked our brains, trying to work out how to survive. Luckily, we were always able to come up with ideas and made it through.

While not every brainstorming session involves making life-and-death choices, the principle is the same. When you face a problem and are groping for answers, brainstorming is a great way to harness your staff’s collective knowledge and come up with solutions. Here are eight tips on how to get the most from your brainstorming sessions.

1. To think outside the box, avoid getting into one. Many management consultants suggest scheduling regular brainstorming sessions so that you and your team can “think outside the box” or do some “blue-sky thinking.” I hate those terms – being creative shouldn’t be confined to specific times in your day. You and your staff should try to be innovative in every aspect of your work, every day. But brainstorming is great for when you get stuck and can’t find a solution.

Related: 3 Ways to Think Outside the Box

2. Choose a creative environment. 
I find that I often come up with my best ideas when I’m on the move – either traveling or exercising or just taking a walk. When you run into a problem and decide to hold a brainstorming session, get everyone out of that stuffy, cramped office, which isn’t going to be conducive to creative thinking.

Enjoy a change of scenery for at least for half an hour before you start working, and remember to take breaks. Diversions like playing a game, exercising or listening to music might help everyone to relax and then go back to work refreshed.

3. Define the Problem, not the Solution.
While everyone gets an opportunity to think creatively during a brainstorming session, there should be a practical purpose for your gathering, or else you may end up going nowhere. When the conversation strays, remind everyone about the problem you’re trying to solve, and keep working toward that objective.

Related: The Biggest Mistake Small Businesses Make in Brainstorming

4. Keep the ideas fresh. Rather than surrounding yourself with the same people at every session, invite employees from other parts of your company to join in. You just might find that employees elsewhere in your business have great ideas – someone on your accounts team might have a suggestion that leads to an unusual and creative marketing strategy, or one of your administrators might point out a recent change that helps the team to come up with a new sales pitch.

5. Make sure everyone is heard. The quiet guy sitting in the corner may have excellent suggestions, but unless you give everyone the chance to speak, he won’t be heard over the person shouting at the top of his voice. Encourage listening as much as talking.

6. Write it all down. Any ideas that may come up during your session should be recorded. Those great suggestions aren’t going to be any help to you if you forget them. I carry a notebook so I can write down every useful idea I come across, no matter what the context, and then follow up later.

7. Make the best ideas a reality. Remember to say yes to potentially good ideas that come out of brainstorming sessions. Sure, you might make an occasional mistake, but if you take a risk, you’re more likely to find success. Before your group disperses, plan out how you’re all going to follow up.

8. Listen and follow through— then lead. In Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, by John Le Carre, the protagonist George Smiley succinctly explains how group decisions are delayed by disagreements and discussions: “A committee is an animal with four back legs.” The same often applies in business, where it can be important to make timely judgments.

While I have discussed here the importance of brainstorming and listening to and learning from others, I often also act on impulse. Over the years, some of my decisions to go ahead with what turned out to be among Virgin’s best ideas have been made off the cuff. (I didn’t get the nickname “Dr. Yes” for nothing.) In business, as in life, you sometimes have to have trust your ability to lead your company to achieve things that others may think are impossible.

Related: Richard Branson on Inspiring Employees

This does involve risk: I decided to go ahead with a few of our less successful ventures in the same way. But on the whole, you should pay close attention to your gut reaction about how to solve a problem and forge ahead.

Ultimately, you need to find a balance between brainstorming your way out of a great idea and acting as lone ranger. Use brainstorm sessions to obtain your team’s perspective, listen to and follow up their best ideas, but in the end you need to make a choice and then take responsibility for that decision.

- Richard Branson

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Bring the convenience and ease to your customers by giving them the privilege or rather, the luxury of just swiping their credit cards as their preferred form of payment for the goods or the services that they acquired. A swipe terminal grants any customer the ease and effortlessness of shopping without having to bring money. In this day and age, most people use credit cards because it is light and very easy to bring. Since most people opt to pay via their credit cards, it is very important to have credit card processing services. These services will gain your business a lot of benefits and more opportunities. Having a credit card processing service gives your business an edge, allow you to gain more customers and widens your client base, which all in all result to the boost of your business’ income.

Similarly, online credit card processing services should be taken into consideration as well, because of the still popular and still trending e-commerce businesses. If you wish to give your e-business a little bit of a kick, then it is recommended to apply for a credit card processing provider which would process payments made via credit cards and provide your business transaction gateway services. An online business without a credit card processing service will struggle to make it big because of the tough competitors.   

Here Are a Few of the Benefits of Offline and Online Card Processing Services

  • Credit card processing serviceswill not only be able to aid in boosting your business’ sales and income but it will also help establish your business in the eyes of customers. It gives off the professionalism vibe and will make customers more comfortable with transacting with you.
  • Having these services give off an impression to customers that you take transactions securely, thus, making the customer to trust you and treat you as a genuine and reliable merchant.
  • Once you have established your legitimacy and reliability to customers, this will in turn boost your sales, allowing your business to gain more income and customers.
  • Having a credit card payment option is a way to motivate cash flow. Moreover, this option allows you to remove the need for invoices and the need to clear checks.
  • Since online shopping is becoming more and more popular these days, if your business does not have a credit card payment option, then you are limiting your business and lose potential customers.

Choosing the Right Credit Merchant Services

A lot of online business owners or merchants are baffled by the thought of merchant and credit card processing services because some companies who offer credit card merchant services present their information in a very complex manner. However, despite the confusion, always try your best to research and ask about each provider as this will help you narrow down your choices and eventually choose one. You will be able to determine which merchant service is good for you through the services and facilities that they offer. Most definitely choose the one that will cater to your entire needs and requirements at the most reasonable price.

The most important thing when choosing a merchant account provider is to choose the provider who works fast, in real-time, reliable and honest. But, whichever merchant account provider you choose, you are guaranteed of more customers and more income. 

- Justin Edwards